DOL Issues New Q&As

In July, the DOL issued a couple of new Questions and Answers regarding the FMLA. One of them addresses the issue of whether a remote or telemedicine visit with a health care provider can qualify as an “in-patient” visit. As a rule, in order for a condition that does not require in-patient care to qualify as a serious health condition one must receive in-person treatment by a health care provider.  

29 CFR Section 825.115(a)(3) provides: 

(3) The requirement in paragraphs (a)(1) and (2) of this section (which require ‘treatment by a health care provider’) for treatment by a health care provider means an in-person visit to a health care provider.  

Since the regulations clearly require an in-person visit, my initial thought was that the answer to this question would be “No.” Well, I was wrong.  Q & A number 12 states: 

12. Due to safety and health concerns related to COVID-19, many health care providers are treating patients for a variety of conditions, including those unrelated to COVID-19, via telemedicine. Telemedicine involves face-to-face examinations or treatment of patients by remote video conference via computers or mobile devices. Under these circumstances, will a telemedicine visit count as an in-person visit to establish a serious health condition under the FMLA?

Yes. Until December 31, 2020, the WHD will consider telemedicine visits to be in-person visits, and will consider electronic signatures to be signatures, for purposes of establishing a serious health condition under the FMLA. To be considered an in-person visit, the telemedicine visit must include an examination, evaluation, or treatment by a health care provider; be performed by video conference; and be permitted and accepted by state licensing authorities. This approach serves the public’s interest because health care facilities and clinicians around the nation are under advisories to prioritize urgent and emergency visits and procedures and to preserve staff personal protective equipment and patient-care supplies.  

So, until at least December 31, 2020, remote or telemedicine visits that meet the requirements above will qualify as in-person visits under the FMLA.  All HR professionals who manage the application of their company’s FMLA program (and lawyers who think they know a thing or two about the FMLA), should make note of this change since it is going to expand the number of situations in which an employee will be eligible for FMLA leave.

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